Boundless, Minecraft, and not having anywhere near the amount of time a game demands

I swear that some games nowadays are basically like having a second job.

FIFA and its weekend tournaments, Destiny 2 and it’s raids… all these ‘game-as-service’ types ask you to log in regularly to keep up to date with what’s going on. But who actually has the time to keep up with them? Certainly not me, what with parenting and the myriad boring responsibilities of being an adult. Feasibly I could just about keep up with something like Destiny 2 if I played that game exclusively – but there are so many great games out there, the idea of playing one to the exclusion of all others just seems wrong.

Which leads me on to Boundless, a Minecraft homage with MMO sensibilities. It’s block-based building but in persistent, shared world, and I was invited to try it ahead of its official release tomorrow, when it will finally receive the ‘1.0’ moniker after four years in early access. I wrote up my impressions for Kotaku UK:

Minecraft-style MMOG Boundless Bursts Out of Beta

The long and the short of it is that the game has a terrible tutorial and character creator, but if you stick with it, the possibilities are… well, boundless. You can collaborate with other players to create huge cities, and open shops to sell rare items for huge profits. It’s pretty cool.

But just looking at some of the superstructures people have created made me feel tired. There is absolutely no way I will have the time or commitment to make anything so grand – and in addition, the game demands that you refuel your plot-marking beacons monthly, otherwise any old player can come and mess with your stuff. All of this had my brain flashing a warning: THIS IS NOT THE GAME FOR YOU, GET AWAY.

Where do people get the time for this? That’s what I want to know. Maybe 20 years back, with weekends yawning like an open chasm to be filled with fun, I might have been tempted to take the plunge. But nowadays I think I’ll leave this kind of stuff to the young ‘uns.

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